Diagnostics, Genetics, Imaging

Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer Should Consider Genetic Testing

In the light of recent discoveries (recently posted on this website) that some advanced prostate cancer patients harbor specific genetic mutations, a recent study summarized in the July 7th National Library of Medicine MedLine Plus suggested that testing for inherited abnormalities in DNA repair genes could provide patients and family members important information about their more »

High Prostate Cancer Risk Linked to Inherited Mutations in DNA-Repair Genes.

Mutations in DNA-repair genes, including the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, are involved in an inherited high risk of prostate cancer and, potentially, the risk of an aggressive cancer, according to researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. The study entitled, “Inherited DNA-Repair Gene Mutations in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer”,  published in The more »

Potential Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer Using Urine Biomarker Protein Signatures.

A recent study revealed protein biomarker combinations in urine that are unique to prostate cancer and 2 of its stages.  A team from the University Health Network in Toronto Canada analyzed urine samples from 50 patients with prostate cancer — 37 with prostate-confined tumors and 13 with tumors that spread — and 24 healthy controls. A targeted protein screen more »

High Prostate Cancer Risk Linked to Inherited Mutations in DNA-repair Genes.

Mutations in DNA-repair genes, including the breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, are involved in an inherited high risk of prostate cancer and, potentially, the risk of an aggressive cancer, according to researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. The study, “Inherited DNA -Repair Gene Mutations in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer” published in The more »

The FDA Approves a New Diagnostic Imaging Agent (Axumin) to Detect Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

Several positron emission tomography (PET) scans (including C-11 choline and acetate PET scans) exist whose purpose is to detect the location of recurrent prostate cancer when the PSA is at low levels. Within the last few days, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved another scan using an injected radioactive agent called Axumin. The following more »

Low Vitamin D Levels May Signal More Aggressive Prostate Cancer But Don’t Expect Supplements to Ward Off Fast-Growing Tumors.

A Northwestern University study of 190 men of median age 64 having their prostate removed found those with low vitamin D levels were more likely to have rapidly growing tumors than those with normal levels of the “sunshine” vitamin.  The study was published on-line in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The researchers found that nearly more »

Prostate Cancer Lesions Accurately Detected by New Imaging Agent

Current tests to initially detect prostate cancer rely on biopsies.  Scans such as bone and CT scans, and choline-11 and acetate-11 PET scans are used to identify sites of cancer metastases.  Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have now developed a new imaging technique to detect prostate cancer cells and malignant lesions.  Their technique is both more »

Predicting Prostate Cancer’s Future Behavior

Developing an accurate prognosis, i.e., predicting how a man’s cancer is likely to behave in the future, is the first and most important step toward optimal care. Future predictions are often looked at with some suspicion. With prostate cancer, however, our power to anticipate future cancer behavior is quite accurate unless there is a lack more »

Information on Prostate Supplements and PSA Testing

The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) publishes a highly recommended e mail periodical entitled NewsPulse to which one can subscribe.  The October issue contained two articles which I will simply summarize and link. The first article concluded that popular prostate supplements such as those containing saw palmetto do not benefit prostate cancer patients.  They do not more »

AR-V7: A Genetic Test to Determine Effectiveness of Enzalutamide and Abiraterone.

When prostate cancer becomes “hormone resistant” or refractory, anti-androgen drugs such as enzalutamide (Xtandi®) and abiraterone (Zytiga®) are often prescribed.  But not all patients respond equally. Some 30 percent of men with advanced prostate cancer have an abnormal version of a prostate cancer protein that connects with testosterone.  The protein is missing a key connector more »

Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer In Active Surveillance Program Not Likely To Succomb To The Disease, Study Shows.

The post below comes from a multi-year study at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. It should be noted below that repeat biopsies performed on men undergoing active surveillance were performed using MRI-guided technology and pathologists checked biopsy tissue levels of proteins made by the PTEN gene, a biomarker for prostate cancer aggressiveness. Men with relatively unaggressive more »

An Alternative to Immediate Prostate Biopsy

The following article dated August 6th came from a site entitled Prostatesnatchers authored by a noted prostate oncologist, Dr. Mark Scholz. He suggests that a commercial OPKO-4Kscore blood test and a high-resolution color Doppler ultrasound or a 3-Tesla multi-parametric MRI can help identify aggressive cancers and minimize the use of standard 12-core prostate biopsies and more »

Active Surveillance for Men with Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

When men are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer, they are split into three broad categories: Low-Risk, Intermediate-Risk and High-Risk. This system, which was invented by Dr. Anthony D’Amico, is helpful for the proper selection of optimal treatment; men with more favorable types of prostate cancer can receive milder therapy and still maintain normal survival rates. more »

Genetic Test Can Determine Whether Expensive Treatments Will Work in Metastatic Cancer

Enzalutamide and abiraterone are drugs that are used to treat metastatic prostate cancer that is growing despite hormonal therapy.  The two drugs work differently.  Enzalutamide targets the androgen (e.g. testosterone) receptor on a cell while abiraterone inhibits androgen synthesis.   The treatments can cost as much as $100,000 per year and not every man responds to more »